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Women on the Go

 

A growing interest has emerged in recent years for trips designed specifically for women.  The realization that “Women are from Venus and Men are from Mars” has spilled over into an acknowledgement that women’s interests often take a different focus than those of men in their activities and points of interest while on a vacation.  This is not to say couples should not travel together, but rather that in addition to a family vacation or a trip with a spouse women also enjoy traveling together.

The trend reveals mothers and daughters, sisters and cousins and great friends sharing experiences together has a huge draw.  Women find celebrating a significant birthday or survival of a grave illness to be a great reason for celebration.  In actuality no excuse is needed to travel together for the shear pleasure of being together and sharing experiences.

Several companies have fine-tuned the niche of women’s travel with smart itineraries filled with unique experiences and special cultural touches, as well as visits and chats with local female figures.   In particular I find the company “Women’s World” has created packages that include special features in each unique itinerary.

A perfect example is a seven night jaunt to Argentina that includes a full array of “must” touring plus tango lessons from an expert at the Dandi Royal Academy in Buenos Aires’ famous neighborhood of San Telmo, not far from where the traditional dance and music originated before spreading like wildfire to the rest of the world.  The tour also features a visit to Mendoza, one of the world’s “great capitals of wine” that’s fast become one of the most popular wine destinations in South America and dinner in Francis Mallman 1884, which pays homage to Andean cuisine in Mendoza’s Bodega Escorihuela winery.  Additionally there is the typical “shop ‘til you drop” experience in the Argentinean capital, a visit to the Evita Peron Crypt and Museum, then off to a tango show.  Not to be missed are lessons in preparing Argentinean steak and empanadas with local cooks. 

A 12-day visit to Israel includes all the important sights and stops including a walking tour of Old Jerusalem, a stop at Yad Vashem , a journey to Masada, a float in the Dead Sea, and experience the beauty of Galilee.   The special interest additions include a visit to Druze village of Ussifiya to visit to a childcare center and a Druze home as a local woman shares her perspective on life in Israel.  The itinerary provides a stop at Rimon Winery where pomegranates are used to prepare wine, then off to dinner and face time with women in a kibbutz.    An additional experience includes visiting the historical home of Sara Aaronsohn in Zichron Yaakov to learn more about the life of the tragic figure who became a spy after witnessing the American genocide.  Also included is a visit to Jerusalem’s Machane Yehuda market as shoppers prepare for Sabbath, a chat about women in the Israeli army and time at the Ilana Goor Museum in Old Jaffa to learn about the artist and her innovative take on furniture.

A 12-day trip to Morocco in 2011 or 2012 includes a visit to the markets of the souks and tanneries as well as a “Bargaining Day” in Fez.  The memory of a Sunset Camel Ride at the Dunes in the Sahara featured in “Lawrence of Arabia” will never be forgotten.  A Moroccan cuisine cooking class at a Riad (traditional Moroccan house or a palace with an interior courtyard or garden) is included in this trip.  Participants will dine at one of Fez’ (second largest city in Morocco) fine Restaurants plus experience a Henna hand tattoo; then off to visit a Womens’ Cooperative to view  Argan Products.   Also included is a visit to bustling Djma el Fnaa Square in Marrakesh to spend your Dirhams.  Morocco has recently become the place to visit.

There are many options from which you may select the perfect “girls getaway” to explore and create friendships and share experiences with women of many cultures. www.womenonthegotravel.com

Testimonials



Unique and fascinating experiences money can't buy. We dined in the private wine cellar of a Tuscan winery, where the meal was prepared by a master chef.   By Lauren Briggs